Reducing Living Expenses

Reducing Living Expenses

1.Try extreme couponing.

It’s one of the best feelings in the world when you can get paid to take home stuff you regularly use. If you do this right, you can actually get paid to coupon. At worst, you’ll save a few extra bucks that you can tuck away for a rainy day. At best, you’ll get tons of free stuff and will be richer in the process.

2.Buy in bulk.

It’s not the easiest way to shop, but it’s usually the most efficient. If you can borrow or buy into a membership to a bulk retailer like Costco, it can make real financial sense. In some cases, you can find brand-name products for sale at serious discounts.
   If you’re hungry and you like chicken, buy four pre-cooked Chickens at Costco at the end of the day, when they go on sale. Sometimes they’ll drop from $5 each to $2.50 each, meaning that you get at least ten hearty meals for about $1 each! Freeze any chickens that you don’t eat immediately.

3.Learn to can foods.

Up to 40% of food in America goes to waste before it is ever eaten. Succulent peaches, blueberries, and even meats can be canned and stored for consumption later. Be smart about the food that you buy. Actually eat it. Food wasted is money wasted.

4.Reduce your utility bills.

Electricity, gas, and other utilities can deeply impact your monthly budget if you let them. So don’t. Be smart about ways to keep your home cool during the summer and warm during winter. You may even consider investing in or building solar panels to channel the sun’s natural energy into electricity. Keep your utilities low, and watch the money you save start to mount.

5.Get a home energy audit.

This will allow you to find out how many dollars are seeping out of your home in the form of lost energy.
   You can perform your own energy audit if you’re the industrious type, but don’t hesitate to hire a professional to complete the audit for you. It should cost anywhere from $300 to $500, which isn’t cheap, but it could help you save much more than that over time (especially if you decide to re-insulate the home).

6.Go hunting or foraging for food.

You may need to invest in gear and permits, but if you already have these, this is an inexpensive way to get your own food. If you’re ethically against the killing of animals, it’s pretty easy to forage for food, depending on where you live. Just make sure to forage only for food whose origin and properties you are sure of. Getting sick or poisoned is never any fun.
   Go deer hunting, duck hunting, or turkey hunting
   Go fishing or fly fishing
   Choose edible flowers, pick wild mushrooms, or forage for food in the Fall
   Start guerrilla gardening or build your own greenhouse